Global Missing Children's Network

Mobilizing the Global Community to Find Missing Children

Working together to better understand and respond to the issues of missing and abducted children

Launched in 1998, the Global Missing Children’s Network (GMCN) is a collaborative venture bringing together 27 member countries on 5 continents to help recover missing and abducted children.

The GMCN brings together like-minded professionals working in the field of child protection and offers them access to a network of specialists and international experts with a goal of uniting the global community to find missing children.

The GMCN has one goal: to unite and mobilize the global community to find missing children.

How does the GMCN accomplish this goal?

  • GMCN members coordinate and build awareness among local, regional and global communities on the issue of missing children. Issue-specific information is made available to the public at large through the GMCN website.
  • GMCN members actively collaborate and share experiences, best practices, tools, research and trends related to missing children and child abduction. The GMCN offers members access to other professionals working in the field and international experts working on the issues. GMCN members assist each other with developing, improving, implementing, and adapting best practices, such as Rapid Emergency Child Alert Systems.
  • Once a year, members have the opportunity to meet in person at the Annual GMCN Conference to discuss ways to strengthen the response to missing and abducted children. For the last six years, the Annual GMCN Conference has been made possible through funding from the Motorola Solutions Foundation. This year’s conference will take place at ICMEC headquarters in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and will once again be supported by the Motorola Solutions Foundation.
  • GMCN members have access to a free, multi-lingual database in which they can upload information about and photographs of missing and abducted children. Access to the database provides members with the tools needed to create posters of missing children, which can then be disseminated through different technology mechanisms (i.e., email, fax, Facebook, Twitter). Technology aids law enforcement during the most critical time in the search for a missing child. Distributing a child’s picture rapidly can mean the difference between a fast recovery and a prolonged search.

What countries are represented in the GMCN?

Albania, Argentina*, Australia, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Canada*, Costa Rica, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica*, Lithuania, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan (Province of China), the United Kingdom*, and the United States.

Those countries marked with a * are home to two GMCN representatives.